Jobs and economy on the minds of young voters before heading to polls

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ALBANY, N.Y. – It's an election year that could decide Ethan Duffy's future job prospects.

“I'm graduating in May, that's why it's especially important to me,” Duffy explained.

It's also important for his fellow classmates, who are also on track to graduate. At their mock presidential debate held four days before the election, the first topic the republican and democrat student clubs tackled was the economy. “The jobs we added, we are still at the same level we were when President Obama assumed office,” said Riley O'Brien with the Republican Student Club.

“When president Obama came into office it was three months after the floor of the economy dropped out from under us,” Duffy explained, who was representing the democrat student club.

Political science professor Len Cutler explained the outlook for the next four years if President Obama were to win. “He's talking about job stimulus, infrastructure development and emphasis on education,” Cutler explained.

Cutlers said Obama would use government as a way to create more jobs. Under Romney job creation would look different. “For Romney, engine of development is private sector. He's talking about job creation, tax cuts, and preserving entitlements,” Cutler added.

It's a path O'Brien wants to see take shape in the next four years. He's afraid under Obama he wont have a job to look forward to after graduation. “The debt I'm incurring I am very worried about, if I won't have a job I won't be able to pay it off,” O'Brien said.

As Duffy's graduation date nears he says he's still not clear about Romney's plan. “I'm not sure what I'd end up doing because I don't have any idea of what his policy would be,” he said.

In an election that's driven by jobs and the economy, both candidates will spin today's numbers released from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to voters hitting the polls on Tuesday. The numbers show 171,000 new jobs created in October. However, unemployment rose slightly to 7.9 percents from 7.8 percents in September.

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